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Chatting With Chris Botti

HUFFINGTON POST
BY MIKE RAGOGNA

A Conversation with Chris Botti

Mike Ragogna: Chris, recently, you played the national anthem and it not only made national news but you also brought Reggie Wayne to tears. That must have been an amazing moment for you.

Chris Botti: I think I did one interview with the Indianapolis newspaper after I performed that, you’re the first person to ask me about it since then. But in my career, I’ve been very fortunate to have some really nice, freaky things happen, like Oprah Winfrey wants me on her show or something like that. Who would’ve ever thought in a million years that the cameras would be somehow fixed on this legendary football player on the exact moment that he starts tearing up? If I would’ve just played the anthem and that hadn’t happened then they would’ve just said, “Hey Chris, nice anthem.” It would’ve just been that. The drama of not only him being affected like that but also the TV cameras catching it is just the wildest thing. You practice millions and millions of hours playing trumpet and then this one thing comes along and everyone remembers, it’s so nice. A lot of credit is due to David Foster for playing those beautiful chords underneath me. I kind of had a backseat role in all of it, but it was pretty thrilling.

MR: For most artists, just performing the national anthem on Monday Night Football is pretty intense as it is.

CB: Yeah, and I’ve done a few of those. I did the AFC Championship and countless other regular football games for NFL, and I did World Series as well. Those are always really fun opportunities to play.

MR: Chris, you have a residency coming up at New York City’s Blue Note between December 15th and the first week of January, and not only are you playing but you’re having guests a slate of special guests join you. What’s it like to take over the Blue Note?

CB: We tour about two hundred fifty, three hundred days a year. The band is a well-oiled machine in that respect. We have a very serious outlook on gigging and performing, so for us to come to New York at that time of year, which is always special, and then to play that legendary jazz club and do forty-five shows in twenty-one nights–I think we’re doing a couple of days where we have three shows in one day–it’s a rush. And you don’t have to get on an airplane so you can walk to work. It’s fantastic. This is our tenth year, so people have come from all over the world to make December fun for them in New York. It’s taken a lot of time for us, traveling around the world, where we were in Istanbul last month or Republic Of Georgia and everyone’s like, “We’ll see you at the Blue Note in December!” You get a feeling that the word has actually spread and people will actually come to the show. It’s really a nice feeling.

Read the full interview here at huffingtonpost.com